EARNING BOARD CERTIFICATION AS A DIPLOMATE OF THE ACVO 

 

What is the ACVO? BECOMING A DACVO®
ADDITIONAL EDUCATION
The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists® is an organization, not an actual physical location, that has established certifying criteria through its American Board of Veterinary Ophthalmology (ABVO) for veterinary ophthalmologists.

After a person graduates from college (4 years) and then veterinary school (4 years), he/she usually completes a 1 year internship in small animal medicine and surgery. The person then serves a 3 year residency in ophthalmology at either a veterinary teaching hospital or at a boarded ophthalmologist's clinic under the supervision of ophthalmologists. Once the residency is completed the board certification process begins, first with a credentials package. If the credentials are accepted by the ABVO Exam Committee, the applicant is allowed to take the examination. The exam is a four day process consisting of written, practical, and surgical parts. Finally, after passing all of the above criteria, the veterinarian is recognized as a "Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists®" or in short, board certified in veterinary ophthalmology. Legally one cannot use this title unless they are fully boarded.    

RESIDENCY
Tips on how to locate a residency program.
   

For more information about residency programs please contact the Residency Chairperson at residency@acvo.org.

CREDENTIAL REQUIREMENTS
If you would like more information about credentials requirements please contact the Credentials Chairperson at credentials@acvo.org..

CERTIFICATION FAQ
What is required for a MD ophthalmologist to become certified as a veterinary ophthalmologist?

ABVO does not have any specific regulations within that would cover a "transfer" of credentials. Rather the College applies general regulations to all applicants which state that to become a veterinary ophthalmologist one must:

1. Be a veterinarian.
2. Have attained the minimum required veterinary experience.
(currently 48 months; 12 months of which must be prior to residency training)
3. Have completed or be scheduled to complete an ABVO-approved residency training program by August 1st of the year in which the examination is to be taken.
4. Be of satisfactory ethical standing.
5. Have completed and submitted by the deadline all documentation and fees required as part of the credentialing process.

It is understood that most state licensing boards have similar requirements installed. Ultimately one must first be a veterinarian to become a veterinary ophthalmologist. Contact the ABVO Residency Committee if you have questions about how to proceed.

 
   
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